Plans for course curriculum over the next year

Woman walking a labyrinth by the sea

We’ve run a couple of surveys of church members in Australasia and North America to ask “what would you like to study courses about?” We got some pretty consistent answers in terms of popularity and priority.

These are the beginners topics ranked by importance to the people who answered the survey:

  1. Understanding the principles and theology of the AJC
  2. What do Johannites do (practice, ritual, traditions)?
  3. What is the AJC about (structure, definitions, community)?
  4. What is Gnosticism (introduction)?
  5. History of Johannite communities (33CE to today)
  6. What is Hermeticism and why is it relevant?

We also asked people which of those six courses they’d pick to start with. That ranking came out exactly the same, so that’s the order we’ll build the courses in.

We also asked whether people were interested in some more in-depth topics. They ranked roughly like this:

  1. The Corpus Hermeticum and other Hermetic Literature
  2. Understanding the Eucharist Service
  3. The Nag Hammadi Library and other Gnostic Scripture
  4. The Secret Book of John – worldview and practice
  5. Understanding the Seven Sacraments
  6. 20th Century Gnosticism
  7. Understanding the Church Calendar
  8. The Gnostic Restoration (19th Century France and beyond)
  9. Medieval Gnostic Movements (Bogomils, Cathars, etc)
  10. Key Schisms and Heresies
  11. Templars and the templar lineage
  12. Martinism

These are lower priority, so they may not show up for a while. But once the first six courses are out, we’re likely to pick the next six off this list.

We also got a ton of great written feedback from people. I’ll feature some of that next week.

Questions? Comments? Ask in the AJC Facebook Group.

Tim Mansfield
Bishop of New South Wales
Bishop Tim is the rector of the Parish of St Uriel the Archangel in Sydney and Bishop of New South Wales. He serves on the Apostolic Council of the AJC. He was ordained in 2008 and consecrated to the episcopacy in 2012.
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